Disaster Kit

Disaster Kit

Electricity, water, heat, air conditioning or telephone service may not work in an emergency. Preparing a disaster supply kit in advance can save precious time in the event you must evacuate or go without utilities for an extended period. Consider including the following items when putting together your disaster supply kit:

 

Watch this video from Red Cross.  You will love it!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Ua1SoRnrJX8

 

 

Visit this site for videos that will help you build you Disaster Kits

http://www.drc-group.com/project/jitt-kit.html

 

  • At least a three-day supply of water (one gallon per person per day). Store water in sealed, unbreakable containers. Replace every six months.
  • A three-to-five day supply of nonperishable packaged or canned food and a non-electric can opener.
  • A change of clothing, rain gear and sturdy shoes.
  • Blankets, bedding or sleeping bags.
  • A first aid kit and prescription medications (be sure to check expiration dates).
  • An extra pair of glasses or contact lenses and solution.
  • A list of family physicians, important medical information and the style and serial number of medical devices such as pacemakers.
  • Special items for infants, the elderly or family members with disabilities.
  • A battery powered AM/FM radio, a flashlight and extra batteries.
  • Identification, credit cards, cash and photocopies of important family documents including home insurance information.
  • An extra set of car and house keys.
  • Tools such as screwdrivers, cutters and scissors. Also duct tape, waterproof matches, an ABC fire. extinguisher, flares, plastic storage containers, needle and thread, pen and paper, a compass, heavy garbage bags and regular household bleach.

Have a kit in each car, one at work or school and larger more complete kits at home. Give emergency supplies and equipment to family, friends and loved ones as gifts.

  • Have smoke detectors through-out your home and keep fresh batteries in them.
  • Secure items that may fall during an earthquake.
  • Make a plan for your escape in the event of a fire and practice it.
  • Keep flashlights around you that work.
  • Keep study shoes next to your bed.

Encourage your neighbors, friends and families to get prepared.

 

After a natural disaster, water  may not be safe to drink.

Listen to local officials to find out if your water is safe.

Make Water Safe
Adding some bleach helps make water safe to use.
If tap water is clear:
1.
Use bleach that does not have an added scent (like lemon).
2.
Add 1/8 teaspoon (8 drops or about 0.75 milliliters) of household
liquid bleach to 1 gallon (16 cups) of water.
3.
Mix well and wait 30 minutes or more before drinking.
If tap water is cloudy:
1.
Use bleach that does not have an added scent (like lemon).
2.
Add 1/4 teaspoon (16 drops or 1.5 milliliters) of household liquid
bleach to 1 gallon (16 cups) of water.
3.
Mix well and wait 30 minutes or more before drinking.
Remember that containers may need to be
sanitized before using them to store safe water:
1.
Use bleach that does not have an added scent (like lemon).
2.
Add 1 teaspoon (64 drops or 5 milliliters) of household liquid
bleach to 1 quart (32oz, 4 cups, or about 1 liter) of water.
3.
Pour this into a clean storage container and shake well, making
sure that the solution coats the entire inside of the container.
4.
Let sit at least 30 seconds, and then pour out solution.
5.
Let air dry OR rinse with clean water that has already been made
safe, if available.
Never mix bleach with ammonia or other cleaners.
Open windows and doors to get fresh air when you
use bleach.
For more information on water use after a natural disaster, please visit